Date:
April 23, 2017
Time:
2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:
TKP Kyoto Shijo Karasuma Conference Center, Conference Room 2A http://www.kashikaigishitsu.net/facilitys/cc-kyoto-shijokarasuma/access/

Date: April 23, 2017 (Sunday)
Time: 2:30–5:00 p.m. (doors open, networking at 2:00)
Place: TKP Kyoto Shijo Karasuma Conference Center, Conference Room 2A
Fee: ¥1000 SWET or JAT members; ¥2,000 non-members
Reservation and Inquiries (日本語 ok): kat(at)jat.org
Access: http://www.kashikaigishitsu.net/facilitys/cc-kyoto-shijokarasuma/access/
京都府京都市下京区仏光寺通室町東入釘隠町247番コーエーレオ
To be followed by dinner and drinks afterwards. Please indicate if you will attend.

 

Topic: “Adventures in Filmland”

Drawing from her thirty years of working with Japanese filmmakers from New Wave to social satire to searing portraits to animation, Beth Cary will discuss her experiences in presenting the Japanese vision abroad. These include the background work of translation of original works, interviews, press materials; interpretation for interviews, screenings, research, business meetings; editing of compendiums on Japanese film and animation. She has worked with directors such as Shinoda Masahiro, Itami Juzo, Kore-eda Hirokazu, Miyazaki Hayao, Takahata Isao. This has culminated in four years in a row of interpreting for Studio Ghibli filmmaker nominees at the Oscar Week Animation Night. Cary finds that delving into the thought process behind the films is key to assisting filmmakers as they convey their artistic intentions to worldwide audiences.


Speaker Profile:

Beth Cary
Interpreter and translator Beth Cary was born and raised in Kyoto and now lives and works in the San Francisco Bay area. She has interpreted for many Japanese filmmakers, including Studio Ghibli’s Miyazaki Hayao, Takahata Isao, and Suzuki Toshio. She co-translated Miyazaki’s two giant volumes of interviews and essays, Starting Point: 1979-1996, and Turning Point: 1997-2008 with Frederik Schodt. Her editing work includes Stone Bridge Press books Anime Encyclopedia 2 and 3 (Jonathan Clements and Helen McCarthy), two books on Samurai films (Patrick Galloway), A Critical Handbook of Japanese Film Directors (Alexander Jacoby), and The Midnight Eye Guide to New Japanese Film (Tom Mes and Jasper Sharp).